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(IAAC) Obj: NGC 198; NGC 200 - Inst: 56CM, f:4.1 StarMaster Dob



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Observation Poster: Jim Anderson <madmoon@bellsouth.net>
Observer: Jim Anderson
Your skills: Intermediate (some years)
Date/time of observation: 11022002/0327uy
Location of site: Camp Reeves, NC (Lat 35:20.8, Elev 600')
Site classification: Rural
Sky darkness: 7/10 <1-10 Scale (10 best)>
Seeing: 8/10 <1-10 Seeing Scale (10 best)>
Moon presence: None - moon not in sky
Instrument: 56CM, f:4.1 StarMaster Dob
Magnification: 120X
Filter(s): None
Object(s): NGC 198; NGC 200
Category: Open cluster.
Class: ----
Constellation: Psc
Data: mag ---  size  --- 
Position: RA --:--  DEC --:--
Description:
NGC 198; Galaxy; 00:39:23.0, +02:47:52, 13.9p; Size=1.2' x1.1'; Class=SAc, PA=80
In Pisces.
120X - NGC198 appears as a very small unresolved Globular cluster. The halo
gradually brightens to a relatively large diffuse core without a stellar
nucleus. I would have guessed a E0 class, but it is a face-on spiral.
NGC 200 a barred spiral agalaxy appears about 6 deg N-E.
220X - NGC 198 appears the same excepr a little larger.
NGC 200; Galaxy; 00:39:34.7, +02:53:19; 13.5B; Size=1.8' x 1.0'; Class SBbc;
PA=167 in Pisces.
120X - NGC 200 appears as a faint not quite symetrical oval. It is a little
difficult to see with direct vision, but shows well with averted vision.
It appears as a thin oval halo with some brighter core.
220X - NGC 200 appears to be a moderately small round core with a bar extending
3 core diameters to each side. The bar or arms extend outward while hooking ccw
out near the tips. This all takes some time and observing tricks to bring out
the detail as the galaxy is dim with the  core easy enough with direct vision.
The bar and arms is another matter. They are barely detectable with direct
vision, more an impression of something being there, requiring averted vision,
black cape and jiggling the scope to bring up the contrast. While seeing is
good the sky is too bright to do this galaxy justice.
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