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(IAAC) Re: Palomar 1 thru 15



Lew, here are all of my Palomar notes, which I have never published in
their entirety.  Rather than post each of these individually, since
I have had my own database for many years, I had already placed
most of my observations into Word 97 format.
Here are my observations on all 15 Palomar Globulars.
Barbara.
Barbara Wilson's Globular Cluster Observations
NGC/IC:none    OTHER: Palomar 1          OBJECT_TYPE: Globular
CONSTELLATION: Cepheus SIZE: 1.8' LISTED_MAGNITUDE: 13.62
RA/DEC: 0333+7935    DATE: 5-13-94 TIME: 11:00 PM SITE: TSP94 SEEING:
6     TRANSPARENCY: 7 TELESCOPE/INSTRUMENT: 20"F/4 EYEPIECE(S): 10mm and
2.8x Klee Barlow MAGNIFICATION(S):FILTER_TYPE: no EYEPIECE_DRAWING:  
SOURCE: Sky Cat  V(TIP):16.5       V(HB): 16.76  CLASS: 12 
DESCRIPTION_AND_NOTES:
I have suspected 3 times a very faint glow and one time a very definite
glow when the seeing settles down. I am seeing it in the exact position
every time. .I am looking at the exact field of Pal 1, and there are two
stars to the south and at the very edge of the bottom of the field
(north) there are the 2 fainter stars (13.4 and 13.5).  In between and
slightly between the 2 northern stars and above them (south) .  Dana
Lambert also confirms seeing glow at same position. Distance 9.2 kpc
Discoverer:Abell aka: 7Zw7
NGC/IC:none          OTHER: Palomar  2         OBJECT_TYPE: Globular
CONSTELLATION: Auriga         SIZE: 1.9'       LISTED_MAGNITUDE: 13.04
RA/DEC:  04 46' 06" +31 22' 51"            DATE: 1-8-95    TIME: 5:04
am  SITE: Columbus, Tx.
SEEING:   6    TRANSPARENCY: 6        TELESCOPE/INSTRUMENT: 20" F/4
EYEPIECE(S): 13mm  MAGNIFICATION(S): 166             FILTER_TYPE: no
EYEPIECE_DRAWING:         SOURCE: skiff
V(TIP): 18.0              V(HB): 20.9            CLASS: 12
DESCRIPTION_AND_NOTES: Small and fairly faint but visible with direct
vision as a round glow. According to Harris AJ 114 April 1997, Palomar 2
is  very distant and the most obscured outer halo globular cluster at 34
kpc from the galactic center, and moving toward perigalacticon on a
highly elliptical orbit. It is unique in that of all galactic globulars,
it is located farthest on the sky from the galactic center. Harris
states that this  cluster is  brighter and more massive than most outer
halo clusters. Extinction E (b-V) = 1.24 Discoverer: Abell  aka: MCG
+05-12-01
Barbara Wilson's Globular Cluster Observations
NGC/IC: none           OTHER: Palomar  3         OBJECT_TYPE: Globular
CONSTELLATION: Sextans        SIZE: 2.8'       LISTED_MAGNITUDE: 13.92
RA/DEC:              DATE: 1-8-95    TIME: 5:04 AM  SITE: COLUMBUS, TX.
SEEING: 6     TRANSPARENCY: 6.5      TELESCOPE/INSTRUMENT: 20" F/4
EYEPIECE(S): 7MM          MAGNIFICATION(S): 288             FILTER_TYPE:
EYEPIECE_DRAWING: YES     SOURCE: SKIFF
V(TIP): 18                V(HB): 20.55           CLASS: 12
DESCRIPTION_AND_NOTES: IN 17 Minute field, Pal 3  is large about 2.5'
visually. It is faint but a distinct haze at location plotted on
MegaStar. No resolution. AKA: Sextans C
Discoverer: Wilson,Badde
NGC/IC:none  OTHER: Palomar 4          OBJECT_TYPE: Globular
CONSTELLATION: Ursa Major     SIZE: 1.4' LISTED_MAGNITUDE:14.2  
RA/DEC: 11 29'16.8"  +28 58'25"          DATE: 5-17-93 TIME: 10:00PM 
SITE: TSP 93 SEEING: 6     TRANSPARENCY: 7  TELESCOPE/INSTRUMENT: 20"
F/4 EYEPIECE(S): 13 MAGNIFICATION(S): 166 FILTER_TYPE: no
EYEPIECE_DRAWING: no      SOURCE: Brian Skiff  V(TIP): 14.2V(HB):
20.65       CLASS: 12 
DESCRIPTION_AND_NOTES: Second most distant globular in Milky Way (97.9
kpc).  I found it located just off a star of about 12th mag. No central
brightening at all, very soft round glow.  Faint, but under these
incredible skies not difficult to see.  According to Brian's chart the
brightest stars are 18th mag, horizontal branch magnitude is 20.6. Has
been plotted on several atlases as the Serpens Dwarf.
Discoverer:"Wilson, Baade
NGC/IC:none  OTHER: Palomar 5          OBJECT_TYPE: Globular
CONSTELLATION: Serpens Cp SIZE: 6.9' LISTED_MAGNITUDE: 11.75 RA/DEC: 15
16' 5.3" -00 6'41"  DATE: 5-17-93 TIME: 1:55 AM  SITE: TSP
93 SEEING: 6     TRANSPARENCY: 7 TELESCOPE/INSTRUMENT: 20" f/4
EYEPIECE(S): 16 pretoria MAGNIFICATION(S): FILTER_TYPE:
EYEPIECE_DRAWING: yes SOURCE: Sky Cat V(TIP):15.0 V(HB): 17.4           
CLASS: 12 
DESCRIPTION_AND_NOTES: Palomar 5 found using MegaStar Chart. Large low
surface brightness, slight central brightening, center is circular and
south of the one star that I see in the globular. .According to Brian
Skiff's chart the brightest stars are 15.0 mag, horizontal branch
magnitude is 17.4. Discovered by: Wilson Distance: 21.8 kpc.
NGC/IC:none  OTHER: Palomar 6          OBJECT_TYPE: Globular
CONSTELLATION: Oph SIZE: 7.2' LISTED_MAGNITUDE: 11.55 RA/DEC:
 DATE: 5-18-93 TIME: 3:18AM   SITE: TSP 93 SEEING: 6
TRANSPARENCY: 7 TELESCOPE/INSTRUMENT: 20" F/4 EYEPIECE(S): 13
MAGNIFICATION(S): 166 FILTER_TYPE: no EYEPIECE_DRAWING: no SOURCE:
Arizona Database V(TIP): ?  V(HB): 19.1
CLASS: 11
 DESCRIPTION_AND_NOTES: One of the Palomar series of globulars.  Pretty
amorphous but sometimes can see it is round. Just to the east of a chain
of 5 stars of 10th mag. Skiff says magnitude is 11.6 approx, and
horizontal branch mag is 19.1. Class 11 globular.  Not distant at 6.2
kpc but suffers from great extinction of 1.45 mag. Discoverer:  Abell
NGC/IC: IC 1276      OTHER: Palomar 7          OBJECT_TYPE: Globular
CONSTELLATION: Ser Cd         SIZE: 7.1'
LISTED_MAGNITUDE: 10.34 RA/DEC: 18 10.7 -0712DATE: 9-3-94 TIME: 9:41 PM 
SITE: Columbus, Tx SEEING: 6     TRANSPARENCY: 7       
TELESCOPE/INSTRUMENT: 20" F/4 EYEPIECE(S): 10.5 mm MAGNIFICATION(S):   
FILTER_TYPE:none EYEPIECE_DRAWING: yes     SOURCE: DSFG V(TIP): V(HB):
18.3 CLASS: 12
 DESCRIPTION_AND_NOTES: Semi resolved globular using 10.5 mm. Class 12
very loose, 40+ stars seen clearly with background haze.Discoverer:
Actually not Abell, but he gets the modern credit. Lewis Swift at Warner
Observatory, Rochester, N.Y. with 16' refractor is the real discoverer.
He described it in the Index Catalogue in the late 1880's.
NGC/IC:none OTHER: Palomar 8          OBJECT_TYPE: Globular
CONSTELLATION: Sagittarius    SIZE: 4.7' LISTED_MAGNITUDE 10.89
 RA/DEC: 18 41'29.9 -19 49'33" DATE: 8-14-93 TIME: 11:00 PM SITE:
Columbus, Tx SEEING: 6 TRANSPARENCY: 6 TELESCOPE/INSTRUMENT: 20" F/4
EYEPIECE(S): 16mm Pretoria MAGNIFICATION(S): 125            
FILTER_TYPE: no EYEPIECE_DRAWING: no      SOURCE: Brian Skiff V(TIP):
15.4 V(HB): 18.9 CLASS: 10
 DESCRIPTION_AND_NOTES: Classed as a class 10 globular rather than a 12
as most Palomar globulars are. According to B.S. it's brightest stars
are 15.9 mag and it's horizontal branch magnitude is 17.3 Peterson
states V(HB) as 18.9 (mag reach needed to resolve cluster). I found Pal
8 in the Milky Way by starhopping to the precise position and see a very
loose globular looking object that appears about 4' in size, it looks as
large as its rated size.  There are 10 stars visible that appear to be
in the 12th to 13th
mag range, these may be foreground stars, as Megastar shows 2 stars
(11.1 mag and 12.0 mag) superimposed at Pal 8's position.  However,
these stars give the globular a semi- resolved appearance. 
 5-13-94 TSP 94 20" f/4 28mm 42' field 2:30 AM -rated 11th mag but
appears brighter I see it as 3', framed by 2 stars slightly east and a
nice triangle of stars very close.  Very mottled at this power, some
individual stars seen at the edges semi resolved easy to see bright.
Distance is 11.7 kpc. Discoverer: Abell
NGC/IC: 6717         OTHER: Palomar 9          OBJECT_TYPE: Globular
CONSTELLATION: Sagittarius    SIZE: 3.9'LISTED_MAGNITUDE: 8.35 
RA/DEC: 1855.1-2242  DATE: 9-18-93 TIME: 11:20 PM SITE: COLUMBUS, TEXAS
SEEING: 6 TRANSPARENCY: 6.5      TELESCOPE/INSTRUMENT: 20" F/4
EYEPIECE(S): 7mm MAGNIFICATION(S): 285 FILTER_TYPE: no EYEPIECE_DRAWING:
no SOURCE: Brian Skiff 
V(TIP): 13.0              V(HB): 15.73 CLASS: 8
DESCRIPTION_AND_NOTES: Class 8 globular, and brightest of the Palomars.
semi resolved,  small round glow with 5 stars seen within the glow.
Double star seen to northeast wide pair to the south and star near
center. Brightest stars are 13 mag, horizontal branch mag is 15.73. 
Reobserved on 8/14/93 10:30 PM In the glow of 35V Sag (mag 5.8) this
glob has bright stellar center and 3 stars superimposed with a bright
circular glow around the 3 stars. 35 V is a yellowish star with a tinge
of orange. The 3 stars form a triangle near the center of the globular
they are 10-12th mag. Modern Discoverer: Abell Actual Discoverer:
William Herschel  Distance: 6.6 kpc.
NGC/IC: OTHER: Palomar 10         OBJECT_TYPE: Globular CONSTELLATION:
Sagitta SIZE: 3.5' LISTED_MAGNITUDE: 13.2 RA/DEC: 1918.2+1834  DATE:
9-18-93 TIME: 10:15 PM SITE: COLUMBUS, TEXAS SEEING: 6 TRANSPARENCY: 6.5
TELESCOPE/INSTRUMENT: 20" F/4 EYEPIECE(S): 7mm
MAGNIFICATION(S): 285 FILTER_TYPE: no EYEPIECE_DRAWING: no SOURCE: Brian
Skiff V(TIP): V(HB): 19.4 CLASS: 12
 DESCRIPTION_AND_NOTES: Very faint glow around and within an equilateral
triangle of stars. Field of view 17' of arc, and it covers 1/4 of the
field for a size of approx 4'.  Used 9mm to find, and 7mm to confirm
object.Used photograph from Deep Space CCD Atlas North to check field
after finding Pal 10 and the photo confirms the observation. To resolve
this cluster would require the ability to see stars to 19.4.  Class 12
globular.Discoverer: Abell Distance: 10.6 kpc
 NGC/IC:none  OTHER: Palomar 11         OBJECT_TYPE: Globular
CONSTELLATION: Aquila  SIZE: 3.2' LISTED_MAGNITUDE: 9.8 
RA/DEC: 1945.3-0802  DATE: 9-18-93 TIME: 11:40 PM SITE:COLUMBUS, TEXAS
SEEING: 6 TRANSPARENCY: 6.5 TELESCOPE/INSTRUMENT: 20" F/4 EYEPIECE(S):
7mm MAGNIFICATION(S): 285 FILTER_TYPE: no EYEPIECE_DRAWING: no SOURCE:
Brian Skiff V(TIP): V(HB): 17.3 CLASS: 11 
DESCRIPTION_AND_NOTES: Not a difficult object to see. Nearby (5') a
bright double star of 12th mag. The cluster has a very mottled central
glow, appearing to be near resolvability but couldn't be resolved. Class
11 globular, horizontal branch mag is 17.3.Discoverer: Abell
Distance 11.9 kpc
NGC/IC: none OTHER: Palomar 12         OBJECT_TYPE: Globular
CONSTELLATION: Capricorn      SIZE: 2.9' LISTED_MAGNITUDE: 11.71
 RA/DEC: 2146.5 -21 15'03" DATE: 9-19-93 TIME: 12:48 AM SITE: COLUMBUS,
TEXAS SEEING: 6 TRANSPARENCY: 6.5 TELESCOPE/INSTRUMENT: 20" F/4
EYEPIECE(S): 7mm MAGNIFICATION(S): 285 FILTER_TYPE: no EYEPIECE_DRAWING:
no SOURCE: Brian Skiff V(TIP): 14.6              V(HB): 17.1 CLASS: 12 
DESCRIPTION_AND_NOTES: Found within a few arc minutes of a distinctive
asterism of 3 stars.  Round glow very small with a star superimposed
with the 13mm eyepiece.with the 7mm eyepiece a star to the east is now
visible and the star appears imbedded within the glow of the
globular.According to Skiff's chart the brightest stars are 14.6 and the
horizontal branch mag is 17.1. So the 2 stars I saw may be within the
globular. checked Megastar later the star to the east is 15.4 mag and
star to west in globular is 14.8, so these may be part of object.  19.3
kpc distance. Discoverer: Zwicky  AKA: Capricorn Dwarf
 NGC/IC: OTHER: Palomar 13  OBJECT_TYPE: Globular  CONSTELLATION:
Pegasus  SIZE: 1.8' LISTED_MAGNITUDE: 13.8 RA/DEC:     DATE: 8-7-94
TIME: 12:56 AM  SITE:Columbus, Tx SEEING: 8     TRANSPARENCY: 6
TELESCOPE/INSTRUMENT: 20" F/4 EYEPIECE(S): 4.8 Nagler
MAGNIFICATION(S): 500    FILTER_TYPE: no EYEPIECE_DRAWING: yes  SOURCE:
BS V(TIP): 17.0 V(HB): 17.7 CLASS: 12 
DESCRIPTION_AND_NOTES: Very difficult to see,although field is easy to
find just 2.5 deg south of Alpha Pegasi. Faint double star is located
2.4' to the east whichis plotted by the GSC as a non-star. Using 7mm
Nagler thecluster could not be seen easily but with 4.8 Nagler it was
visible without too much averted vision, excellent seeing,clear and
transparent night. The object appeared less than 1'of arc at 500X, faint
diffuse and small.  Its brightest stars are 17th mag according to Brian
Skiff's list of globulars. A distant globular at 24.4 kpc.Discoverer:
Wilson AKA: CGCG430-61
 NGC/IC: OTHER: Palomar 14         OBJECT_TYPE: Globular CONSTELLATION:
Hercules SIZE: 2.1' LISTED_MAGNITUDE: 14.68 
RA/DEC: 16 11 4.9" +14 57' 29"     DATE: 4-27-92 TIME: 5:10 AM  SITE:
TSP92  SEEING: 6     TRANSPARENCY: 6 TELESCOPE/INSTRUMENT: 20" F/4 
EYEPIECE(S): 7mm MAGNIFICATION(S): FILTER_TYPE: no EYEPIECE_DRAWING:
no      SOURCE: Sky Cat V(TIP): 17.6 V(HB): 20.06  CLASS: 12
DESCRIPTION_AND_NOTES: Palomar 14 nailed! As exactly on MegaStar Chart. 
Not nearly as
difficult as Pal 15 though listed mag is fainter, Pal 14 has a higher
surface brightness than Pal 15.  Seen as a diffuse
soft round glow, no brightening to middle, no hint of any resolution but
edges of the globular are fairly strong
against background sky.  According to Skiff, brightest stars are 17.6
mag and horizontal branch mag of stars is 20.06  One of most distant
globulars at 72.4 kpc. Discoverer: Arp
NGC/IC: OTHER: Palomar 15         OBJECT_TYPE: Globular CONSTELLATION:
Oph SIZE: 4' LISTED_MAGNITUDE: 14.2 RA/DEC: 1659.9-0032  DATE: 4-27-92
TIME: 4:00 AM  SITE: TSP 92
SEEING: 6     TRANSPARENCY: 6 TELESCOPE/INSTRUMENT: 20" F/4 EYEPIECE(S):
7mm MAGNIFICATION(S): FILTER_TYPE: no EYEPIECE_DRAWING: no      SOURCE:
Sky Cat V(TIP): 17.1 V(HB):
19.95    CLASS: 12 DESCRIPTION_AND_NOTES: Faintest globular I've seen to
date. (Update 1997:  A number of the Terzan globulars are as difficult,
or more difficult, and UKS 1 is the most difficult of all) Using
MegaStar chart I could
pinpoint exact location near 2 stars. Globular was seen only
intermittantly using extreme averted vision. Size or shape not
discernable.  According to Skiff brightest stars are 17.1 mag and
horizontal branch mag is 19.95.   Pal 15 has a higher extinction than 14
and it's stars are redder B-V(tip) 1.8 vs 1.3 for Pal 14 which could
help explain it's visual difficulty.
Update 1994: Since my 1992 observation, several observers have attempted
Palomar 15 under pristine skies using smaller aperture.  I have been 
contacted by a reliable observer who used a 18")
Discoverer: Zwicky Very distant at 41.1 kpc.
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